TasteToronto | Pōpa

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Pōpa

  • Rundown
  • Dishes

Pōpa

Real Quick Rundown

Carly Gatto

Carly Gatto

Instagram

9 months ago

Pōpa

Named after Mount Popa -- an extinct volcano with rich mythical history in central Myanmar (formerly Burma) -- this new spot nestled within the shops at Bayview Village introduces Burmese cuisine to Toronto as we've never seen it before. Pōpa opened its doors in January 2020 by the owner and chef Hemant Bhagwani and partner Trevor Lui.

The Space:

Just down the hall from Bhagwani's Indian restaurant Goa, Pōpa feels right at home within the bright and bustling atmosphere in Bayview Village. A perfect place for patrons to be warmly welcomed with professional service by knowledgeable and hospitable staff.

Popa

Greenery surrounds the walls, tables and walkways keeping the vibe airy and tropical without being overbearing. The warm and minimalist interior is contrasted by the complex flavors of the dishes, giving guests a completely unique experience of Burmese culture not typically found in Toronto.

The Drinks:

As a trained sommelier, Bhagwani wanted to break the standards of how guests typically order wine by adding blends instead of single varietals to a small and concise wine list -- complementing the diverse flavours of the food.  Everything on the menu is priced by the ounce to allow for pairings with each course.

The cocktail menu, designed by Lui, pays homage to classic drinks from 1920's Myanmar with the Pegu Club ($12), blending London dry gin with curaçao, fresh lime and bitters.

Popa

The list also includes unique mocktails like The Halle Berries ($7), which mixes muddled blueberries, longan honey syrup, lemon juice, soda water and basil for an easily crushable and light way to kick start the meal.

The Food:

Popa

Drawing inspiration from a Burmese restaurant in India and street food found in Myanmar during his travels, Bhagwani aimed to capture the essence of essential dishes eaten by locals, wanting to make sure Toronto didn't miss out on the experience of these specialized flavors.

Fusing Burmese, Balinese and Macanese cultures, the menu at Pōpa keeps the main Burmese food staples of tea leaves and chickpeas, while adding elements of Chinese noodles and Indian soups.

A welcome addition to the halls of Bayview Village, Pōpa stands out amongst the crowd with a refreshing take on a new style of food that everyone should be lining up to try. 

Go Here For

Pōpa

Shan Tofu

Shan Tofu

Made entirely in house, the Shan Tofu is soy-free derived from chickpeas with a silky polenta-like texture. Each pillowy bite is the perfect blend of smoothness with a hint of tangy spice from the tamarind ginger dressing. It comes in a healthy portion that is easily shareable...

Pōpa

Organic Mohinga

Organic Mohinga

Traditionally served at breakfast, this fish noodle soup consists of red snapper, sautéed lemongrass, pea broth and is topped with a boiled duck egg. A comforting Burmese dish with perfectly thick and satisfying broth packed with protein.

Pōpa

Steamed Lamb Leg Bao

Steamed Lamb Leg Bao

This dish takes its inspiration from Vietnamese cuisine. The bao consists of roast honey lamb-leg marinated for 48 hours and grilled twice, cucumber, coriander with hoisin sauce and topped with sriracha.

Pōpa

Chai Tea Cheesecake

Chai Tea Cheesecake

Made with honey, salted caramel sauce and peanut brittle drizzled with a garam masala syrup. Perfectly paired with an Oolong tea to cap off the experience.   

Pōpa

Khow Suey

Khow Suey

Hand-tossed noodle salad made with chicken curry, toasted pea flour, hard-boiled duck egg and crispy noodles. Served traditionally with optional toppings on the side.

Pōpa

Tea Leaf Salad

Tea Leaf Salad

A must-try national Burmese dish is the Tea Leaf Salad. Made with shredded romaine lettuce, fried yellow beans, fried garlic, sesame seeds, jalapenos, sunflower seeds, peanuts and dried shrimp. The tea leaves are fermented from four to six weeks to ensure a toned-down bitterne...

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Pōpa

Map

North York

2901 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M2K 1E6

Get Directions

(647) 343-8555

Call

www.popatoronto.com

Visit

@popa.toronto

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Burmese

Restaurants

Pōpa

2901 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M2K 1E6

Carly Gatto

Carly Gatto

Instagram

9 months ago

Pōpa

Named after Mount Popa -- an extinct volcano with rich mythical history in central Myanmar (formerly Burma) -- this new spot nestled within the shops at Bayview Village introduces Burmese cuisine to Toronto as we've never seen it before. Pōpa opened its doors in January 2020 by the owner and chef Hemant Bhagwani and partner Trevor Lui.

The Space:

Just down the hall from Bhagwani's Indian restaurant Goa, Pōpa feels right at home within the bright and bustling atmosphere in Bayview Village. A perfect place for patrons to be warmly welcomed with professional service by knowledgeable and hospitable staff.

Popa

Greenery surrounds the walls, tables and walkways keeping the vibe airy and tropical without being overbearing. The warm and minimalist interior is contrasted by the complex flavors of the dishes, giving guests a completely unique experience of Burmese culture not typically found in Toronto.

The Drinks:

As a trained sommelier, Bhagwani wanted to break the standards of how guests typically order wine by adding blends instead of single varietals to a small and concise wine list -- complementing the diverse flavours of the food.  Everything on the menu is priced by the ounce to allow for pairings with each course.

The cocktail menu, designed by Lui, pays homage to classic drinks from 1920's Myanmar with the Pegu Club ($12), blending London dry gin with curaçao, fresh lime and bitters.

Popa

The list also includes unique mocktails like The Halle Berries ($7), which mixes muddled blueberries, longan honey syrup, lemon juice, soda water and basil for an easily crushable and light way to kick start the meal.

The Food:

Popa

Drawing inspiration from a Burmese restaurant in India and street food found in Myanmar during his travels, Bhagwani aimed to capture the essence of essential dishes eaten by locals, wanting to make sure Toronto didn't miss out on the experience of these specialized flavors.

Fusing Burmese, Balinese and Macanese cultures, the menu at Pōpa keeps the main Burmese food staples of tea leaves and chickpeas, while adding elements of Chinese noodles and Indian soups.

A welcome addition to the halls of Bayview Village, Pōpa stands out amongst the crowd with a refreshing take on a new style of food that everyone should be lining up to try. 

Pōpa

Shan Tofu

Shan Tofu

Made entirely in house, the Shan Tofu is soy-free derived from chickpeas with a silky polenta-like texture. Each pillowy bite is the perfect blend of smoothness with a hint of tangy spice from the tamarind ginger dressing. It comes in a healthy portion that is easily shareable...

Pōpa

Organic Mohinga

Organic Mohinga

Traditionally served at breakfast, this fish noodle soup consists of red snapper, sautéed lemongrass, pea broth and is topped with a boiled duck egg. A comforting Burmese dish with perfectly thick and satisfying broth packed with protein.

Pōpa

Steamed Lamb Leg Bao

Steamed Lamb Leg Bao

This dish takes its inspiration from Vietnamese cuisine. The bao consists of roast honey lamb-leg marinated for 48 hours and grilled twice, cucumber, coriander with hoisin sauce and topped with sriracha.

Pōpa

Chai Tea Cheesecake

Chai Tea Cheesecake

Made with honey, salted caramel sauce and peanut brittle drizzled with a garam masala syrup. Perfectly paired with an Oolong tea to cap off the experience.   

Pōpa

Khow Suey

Khow Suey

Hand-tossed noodle salad made with chicken curry, toasted pea flour, hard-boiled duck egg and crispy noodles. Served traditionally with optional toppings on the side.

Pōpa

Tea Leaf Salad

Tea Leaf Salad

A must-try national Burmese dish is the Tea Leaf Salad. Made with shredded romaine lettuce, fried yellow beans, fried garlic, sesame seeds, jalapenos, sunflower seeds, peanuts and dried shrimp. The tea leaves are fermented from four to six weeks to ensure a toned-down bitterne...

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